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nationalaquarium:

Here’s a treat for you because it’s almost the weekend…and cephalopods are awesome. 

nationalaquarium:

Here’s a treat for you because it’s almost the weekend…and cephalopods are awesome. 

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rkherman:

A Black-eyed Hermit Crab (Pagurus armatus) using the shell of a Lewis’s Moon Snail (Neverita lewisii).

The first image is a phantom view, and the second one is an animated gif, both showing what the hermit crab’s body looks like inside the shell.

(Apparently animated gifs is the cool thing to do, so I thought I’d see how it can enhance scientific illustration.)

(via scientificillustration)

wakatobidiveresort:

As the name suggests, this species looks like the calcareous green algae, Halimeda, with which it normally associates. It is green or green with white patches (like those seen on the dyeing algae). The nose is long, the caudal peduncle is narrow and the tail is not incised but more rectangular in shape. (Photograph: Scott W. Michael)

wakatobidiveresort:

As the name suggests, this species looks like the calcareous green algae, Halimeda, with which it normally associates. It is green or green with white patches (like those seen on the dyeing algae). The nose is long, the caudal peduncle is narrow and the tail is not incised but more rectangular in shape. (Photograph: Scott W. Michael)

(via alongthereef)

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awesome-oceans:

The Sea Swallow(Glaucus atlanticus)
Also known as the Blue Sea Slug, the Blue Glaucus, and the Blue Ocean Slug, this is a species of nudibranch (sea slugs.) It will typically grow up to 3cm in length with six “feathered” appendages. This species is pelagic: it lives in the open ocean. It floats upside-down using the ocean’s surface tension and a ventral gas sac. The Swallow utilizes counter shading: it’s dorsal side is silver grey, and it’s ventral side is striped with dark and pale blues. But the most interesting thing about Glaucus is its feeding habits… it is immune to the venomous sting of nematocysts of sea jellies. So, it feeds on the most venomous ones like the Portuguese Man of War (Physalia physalis)  and other surface-dwelling organisms like Janthina janthina. Glaucus, once devouring the most dangerous parts of these organisms, selects the highest-quality stinging cells and stores them in their cnidosacs in the tips of their feather-like fingers.
Learn more about the Glaucus here

awesome-oceans:

The Sea Swallow(Glaucus atlanticus)

Also known as the Blue Sea Slug, the Blue Glaucus, and the Blue Ocean Slug, this is a species of nudibranch (sea slugs.) It will typically grow up to 3cm in length with six “feathered” appendages. This species is pelagic: it lives in the open ocean. It floats upside-down using the ocean’s surface tension and a ventral gas sac. The Swallow utilizes counter shading: it’s dorsal side is silver grey, and it’s ventral side is striped with dark and pale blues. But the most interesting thing about Glaucus is its feeding habits… it is immune to the venomous sting of nematocysts of sea jellies. So, it feeds on the most venomous ones like the Portuguese Man of War (Physalia physalis)  and other surface-dwelling organisms like Janthina janthina. Glaucus, once devouring the most dangerous parts of these organisms, selects the highest-quality stinging cells and stores them in their cnidosacs in the tips of their feather-like fingers.

Learn more about the Glaucus here

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I was featured on NPR on Wednesday talking about the Port of Miami dredge project and how I am helping to save the doomed corals! Check it out

A megalodon tooth stuck in a whale vertebrae. This is the most badass fossil in existence.

A megalodon tooth stuck in a whale vertebrae. This is the most badass fossil in existence.

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toastoat:

boops boops in a bucket

I like the the simplified classification: B. boops. stupid robot fish

toastoat:

boops boops in a bucket

I like the the simplified classification: B. boops. stupid robot fish

(Source: ghostoat, via ichthyologist)

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thelovelyseas:

Suckerfish attached to the caudal fin of a Whale Shark. by Jason Edwards

Lol when I first saw this I thought the tail was a great white shark that the whale shark had captured and was dragging along…

thelovelyseas:

Suckerfish attached to the caudal fin of a Whale Shark. by Jason Edwards

Lol when I first saw this I thought the tail was a great white shark that the whale shark had captured and was dragging along…

(Source: thelovelyseas)

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Natural History Redux

I promise this is the most amazing 30 minutes you will spend this month. This is the free 720p version.

The full 1080p version is available for $5 here. I guarantee the HD is worth it, and all proceeds go directly to reef restoration! I am personally working on the supported project, and once again it is 100% worth $5.

Enjoy.