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Guys, It Was So Cold In Norway Last Weekend That A School Of Fish Froze In Place 

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Guys, It Was So Cold In Norway Last Weekend That A School Of Fish Froze In Place 

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Puffers, man, They’re all the rage…Puffer fish, when provoked, protect themselves by releasing a nasty toxin that can be deadly. But the dolphins appear to have figured out how to make the fish release it in just the right amount.After chewing on the puffer fish and passing it around between one another, the dolphins appeared to enter into a trance-like state."[T]hey began acting most peculiarly, hanging around with their noses at the surface as if fascinated by their own reflection," noted zoologist Rob Pilley. "It reminded us of that craze a few years ago when people started licking toads to get a buzz, especially the way they hung there in a daze afterwards. It was the most extraordinary thing to see."The behavior was recorded on camera by the makers of the nature documentary, Dolphins: Spy in the Pod — a series produced for BBC One. Here’s the trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rBSatvvKVOo

Puffers, man, They’re all the rage…

Puffer fish, when provoked, protect themselves by releasing a nasty toxin that can be deadly. But the dolphins appear to have figured out how to make the fish release it in just the right amount.


After chewing on the puffer fish and passing it around between one another, the dolphins appeared to enter into a trance-like state.

"[T]hey began acting most peculiarly, hanging around with their noses at the surface as if fascinated by their own reflection," noted zoologist Rob Pilley. "It reminded us of that craze a few years ago when people started licking toads to get a buzz, especially the way they hung there in a daze afterwards. It was the most extraordinary thing to see."

The behavior was recorded on camera by the makers of the nature documentary, Dolphins: Spy in the Pod — a series produced for BBC One. Here’s the trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rBSatvvKVOo

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rhamphotheca:

What Is Lake Vostok?
by Becky Oskin
Deep, dark, and mysterious, Lake Vostok is one of the deepest subglacial lakes in the world.
Buried under more than 2 miles (3.7 kilometers) of ice near Vostok research station in Antarctica, the lake filled before Antarctica froze 15 million years ago, researchers think. Covered with ice for millennia, cut off from light and contact with the atmosphere, Lake Vostok is one of the most extreme environments on Earth.
The freshwater lake may harbor a unique ecosystem of microbes and other creatures that evolved in isolation for hundreds of thousands of years. These “extremophiles" could mimic life on other moons and planets, such as Jupiter’s icy moon Europa. Only meltwater from the overlying icesheet and drainage from Antarctica’s subglacial waterways have touched the lake since it froze over during the Miocene period. This constant replenishment means the water in the lake may be only as old as the ice that melts to form it, some 700,000 to 800,000 years, according to ice cores. But the true age of the lake water is unknown…
(read more: Live Science)
image by Nicole Ranger-Fuller/National Science Fdn.

rhamphotheca:

What Is Lake Vostok?

by Becky Oskin

Deep, dark, and mysterious, Lake Vostok is one of the deepest subglacial lakes in the world.

Buried under more than 2 miles (3.7 kilometers) of ice near Vostok research station in Antarctica, the lake filled before Antarctica froze 15 million years ago, researchers think. Covered with ice for millennia, cut off from light and contact with the atmosphere, Lake Vostok is one of the most extreme environments on Earth.

The freshwater lake may harbor a unique ecosystem of microbes and other creatures that evolved in isolation for hundreds of thousands of years. These “extremophiles" could mimic life on other moons and planets, such as Jupiter’s icy moon Europa. Only meltwater from the overlying icesheet and drainage from Antarctica’s subglacial waterways have touched the lake since it froze over during the Miocene period. This constant replenishment means the water in the lake may be only as old as the ice that melts to form it, some 700,000 to 800,000 years, according to ice cores. But the true age of the lake water is unknown…

(read more: Live Science)

image by Nicole Ranger-Fuller/National Science Fdn.

(via quasiflexuralthrusting)

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secretofthesea:

Jewel Anemone’s belong to a group of anthozoans and are not true anemones. You can most often find them on underwater cliff faces.
cool fact: they reproduce by splitting in half creating 2 new identical anemones. 


…. All anemones are anthozoans…
Jewel Anemone: a cold water coral (Corynactis viridis)
Also, they are a type of corallimorph (order corallimorpharia) a kind of evolutionary link between corals and anemones which also includes mushroom corals (discosomatidae) and ricordea (ricordeidae)

secretofthesea:

Jewel Anemone’s belong to a group of anthozoans and are not true anemones. You can most often find them on underwater cliff faces.

cool fact: they reproduce by splitting in half creating 2 new identical anemones. 

…. All anemones are anthozoans…


Jewel Anemone: a cold water coral (Corynactis viridis)


Also, they are a type of corallimorph (order corallimorpharia) a kind of evolutionary link between corals and anemones which also includes mushroom corals (discosomatidae) and ricordea (ricordeidae)

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awkwardsituationist:

brian skerry photographs the results of commercial bluefin tuna fishing in the mediterranean. the world wildlife fund estimates that each year, 4.4 million sharks and 90,000 turtles are unintentionally caught as bycatch from unregulated commercial tuna fisheries using long lines and drift nets. a shark caught in a net will suffocate to death. shark numbers have declined by as much as 80 per cent worldwide, with a third of all species now threatened by extinction (pew charitable trusts)

(via thingsofthewild)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Long-rayed Sand-diver (Trichonotus elegans)

Also known as the Threadfin Sand-diver, the long-rayed sand-diver is a species of sanddiver that is native to the Western Indian Ocean and the Western Pacific. Long-rayed sand-divers usually inhabit coastal reef slopes and lagoons and are often seen in large groups. These groups usually form a harem led by one male fish, who uses his elegant fins to court the females.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Perciformes-Trichonotidae-Trichonotus-elegans

Image(s): Klaus Stiefel

(via ichthyologist)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Urchin Crab (Dorippe frascone)

Also known as the carrier crab, the urchin crab is a species of dorippid crab that is found in the Red Sea and eastern Indian Ocean. Like its common name suggests this crab is famous for the symbiotic relationship it holds with several species of sea urchin. The urchin crab will grasp an urchin (usually A.radiata or D.setosum) with its back two legs and carry it around on its carapace. The urchin’s spines then provide the crab with protection, and the urchin will get access to a quick ride to new feeding grounds and will passively submit to this relationship.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Decapoda-Brachyura-Dorippidae-Dorippe-fascone

Image Source(s)

see-youontheother-side:

thefuuuucomics:

Well, there goes my plans of going to the beach

WHAT?!

Yup. This is the aptly named Goblin Shark (Mitsukurina owstoni)

~a rare, poorly known species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a “living fossil”, it is the only extant representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. This species looks unlike any other shark, with a long flattened snout, highly protrusible jaws containing prominent nail-like teeth, and pink coloration. It is usually between three and four meters (10–13 ft) long when mature, though can grow considerably larger. Goblin sharks inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts around the world at depths greater than 100 m (330 ft), with adults found deeper than juveniles.

see-youontheother-side:

thefuuuucomics:

Well, there goes my plans of going to the beach

WHAT?!

Yup. This is the aptly named Goblin Shark (Mitsukurina owstoni)

~a rare, poorly known species of deep-sea shark. Sometimes called a “living fossil”, it is the only extant representative of the family Mitsukurinidae, a lineage some 125 million years old. This species looks unlike any other shark, with a long flattened snout, highly protrusible jaws containing prominent nail-like teeth, and pink coloration. It is usually between three and four meters (10–13 ft) long when mature, though can grow considerably larger. Goblin sharks inhabit upper continental slopes, submarine canyons, and seamounts around the world at depths greater than 100 m (330 ft), with adults found deeper than juveniles.

(via ichthyologist)

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